American Association of Equine Practitioners: Emergency & Disaster Preparedness

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When an emergency or natural disaster occurs, it is always in the best interest of the horses for both the equine practitioner and the horse owner to be prepared. Foreign animal disease outbreaks or other catastrophic events can adversely affect the health and well-being of horses. The preparation must be as thorough as possible knowing that circumstances will highlight the weaknesses rather than the strengths of those involved.

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Emergency Horse Care Poster

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BEFORE YOU CALL YOUR VETERINARIAN: Assess your horse’s condition to the best of your abilities. This information will help the veterinarian determine the severity of the condition and be better prepared to provide prompt and efficient treatment upon arrival. When

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Management of Wounds in Horses

A splint supporting the back leg of a horse with a severe flexor tendon
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Most wounds should involve at least a phone call to your veterinarian, especially if they are near a joint or tendon. Being familiar with basic anatomy will be of tremendous value in helping describe wound location and how serious they are. Doing all the initial steps right are the biggest keys to a successful outcome.

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Fractures in Horses: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

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After Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro underwent surgical repair of a severe fracture many equine veterinarians were hearing the same statement “I didn’t think you could fix a broken leg in a horse”. The truth is some you can and some you cannot.

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Enteroliths: A Rock and a Hard Place

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Enteroliths are one of the leading causes of severe colic in the state of California. The word enterolith is derived from the Greek terms “entero” meaning intestinal and “lith” meaning stone (Figure 1). The high incidence of enterolith formation in California is presumably due to the mineral content of our hay and water. Commonly referred to as stones, enteroliths are composed of struvite crystals which coalesce around some central object like a pebble or a small piece of wire ingested by the horse.

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Equine Colic: What to Expect

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Colic. To some, it is a term that is unfortunately all together too familiar; to others, it is a word that causes fear with little understanding of what it is. While it is a situation we would all like to avoid, it is important to have a knowledge of what colic is, some of its causes and potential ways to minimize it’s occurrence, and how your veterinarian may deal with it.

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Colic in Horses: What You Should Know

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The word “colic” comes from the Greeks and means “abdominal pain”. Horses are notorious for colic and are predisposed to it when compared to other species. Signs of colic include but are not limited to: being “off feed”, depressed, looking/biting at the flanks, stretching as if to urinate, kicking at the abdomen, and rolling in pain. There are many factors that predispose horses to colic.

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