Blog Archives

Long-term Outcome of Standing Medial Patellar Ligament Splitting to Manage Horses Exhibiting Delayed Patellar Release: 64 Horses

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A standing surgical technique for splitting the medial patellar ligament is described, and the long-term (average 4.5-years) efficacy of the procedure in horses exhibiting delayed patellar release is reported.

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Long Toes in the Hind Feet and Pain in the Gluteal Region: An Observational Study of 77 Horses

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This study deals with the relationship between long toes in the hind feet and pain in the gluteal region in horses, and the remedial value of trimming/shoeing that moves the breakover point back at the toe.

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Navicular Syndrome Poster

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Hind Limb Anatomy Poster

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Management of Wounds in Horses

A splint supporting the back leg of a horse with a severe flexor tendon
laceration.

Most wounds should involve at least a phone call to your veterinarian, especially if they are near a joint or tendon. Being familiar with basic anatomy will be of tremendous value in helping describe wound location and how serious they are. Doing all the initial steps right are the biggest keys to a successful outcome.

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Overview of Ringbone in Horses

Figure 2. Compare the new bony growth along the front of this arthritic pastern joint to the normal one in figure 1.

The pastern joint, also known as the proximal interphalangeal joint, is a relatively common source of lameness in horses. Degenerative joint disease/arthritis of this joint is commonly referred to as high ringbone. Low ringbone refers to the same type of degenerative joint disease of the coffin joint and is much less common.

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What We Know and What We’re Learning about Laminitis

Figure 4: Venogram of a horse with
Laminitis.

The prognosis for horses with laminitis is very hard to predict. Severity of the radiographs doesn’t always correlate well with the amount of lameness seen clinically. The best way to guarantee the highest level of success is to assemble a team of experts including your farrier, veterinarian and trainer. While we are a long way off from a full understanding of the disease, advances in management of Laminitis are occurring at a steady pace.

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Advances in Lameness

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It is an exciting time to be a veterinarian who makes his/her living by diagnosing and treating lameness in horses. Our ability to diagnose lameness has improved dramatically over the past decade with the explosion of technology available. Several newer therapies are now available for certain lameness conditions, and are a nice addition to the therapeutic options available.

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Silicosis in Horses

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In the scenic foothills of the Central coast of California, there lurks a quiet problem that can lead to severe disease in our horses. Commonly known as ‘chalk rock’, this dusty rock form can cause an irreversible lung condition known as silicosis.

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Cresty Necks and Laminitis: Equine Endocrinology Part I

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The two main endocrinologic concerns in horses are equine Cushing’s disease and equine metabolic syndrome. These disorders are increasing in prevalence as our equine population is better cared for and living longer. These disorders can have two main similarities: 1) insulin resistance 2) the potentially devastating possibility of laminitis. It is important to understand the signs of insulin resistance and be able to effectively manage these horses to decrease the risk of laminitis.

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