Blog Archives

Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome in Adult Horses

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Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS) is prevalent in our equine population and can be a cause of suboptimal performance and behavioral issues. It has been estimated that approximately one to two thirds of adult horses have gastric ulcers depending on level of work and management practices.

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Cresty Necks and Laminitis: Equine Endocrinology Part I

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The two main endocrinologic concerns in horses are equine Cushing’s disease and equine metabolic syndrome. These disorders are increasing in prevalence as our equine population is better cared for and living longer. These disorders can have two main similarities: 1) insulin resistance 2) the potentially devastating possibility of laminitis. It is important to understand the signs of insulin resistance and be able to effectively manage these horses to decrease the risk of laminitis.

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Deworming Programs– One Size Does Not Fit All

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Over the past several years, there has been a huge shift in the equine veterinary community’s thoughts on parasite prevention. It is difficult to pick up a horse magazine or browse an equine website these days without reading about parasite resistance. Parasite resistance to dewormers is increasing throughout the world, which is particularly concerning given the lack of new types of dewormers available. While there are many brand names, there are really only three main types of dewormer drugs, so we need to slow emerging resistance to them as much as possible.

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Equine Colic: What to Expect

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Colic. To some, it is a term that is unfortunately all together too familiar; to others, it is a word that causes fear with little understanding of what it is. While it is a situation we would all like to avoid, it is important to have a knowledge of what colic is, some of its causes and potential ways to minimize it’s occurrence, and how your veterinarian may deal with it.

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Biosecurity: Why it should be important to you

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Biosecurity is the undertaking of management practices that can reduce the risk of outbreaks and minimize the spread of infectious disease. Until fairly recently this word was not often associated with the horse industry even though many horse operations maintain some general biosecurity practices. However, recent infectious disease outbreaks have brought to light the necessity for applying biosecurity practices, to some extent, at all horse facilities.

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Equine Strangles

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Strangles is considered one of the three most significant respiratory diseases of horses. Because it is so highly contagious, and horses are a very mobile population, achieving prevention and control can be difficult. It is important to be aware of the typical clinical signs and discuss vaccination of horses at risk with your veterinarian.

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Tissue, Please! Basic Types of Nasal Discharge

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Nasal discharge can vary in significance, from being innocuous to being indicative of a serious problem. It is important to have an understanding about which types of nasal discharge signify a problem worthy of an immediate call to your veterinarian, and how best to describe the discharge to your veterinarian.

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How to Collect Manure for a Fecal Egg Count

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When doing an FEC, it is important to wait the correct amount of time after the last dewormer was administered. So, if the last dewormer used was:

  • ivermectin: wait 12 weeks
  • moxidectin: wait 16 weeks
  • pyrantel salts: wait 8 weeks
  • fenbendazole or oxibendazole: wait 8 weeks

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